You may be wearing the wrong bra size, our lingerie expert says

If you are in possession of a set of breasts and a wearer of bras, chances are you’ve heard the oft stated statistic that most of us are going around this world wearing the wrong size support garment.  Chances also are that you are part of that oft stated statistic.

*photo from Linea Intima

A recent in store client survey by Linea Intima, a group of boutique lingerie shops here in Toronto, showed that 90% of women are wearing the wrong size bra. While it may seem like a non issue, wearing the wrong bra size can cause a number of issues, from unhealthy posture leading to back pain, to acute discomfort, to the point of injury, as anyone who’s felt the stab of an errant underwire can attest.  Fortunately, this happens to be an issue with an easy fix: a professional and expert bra fitting.

We know it can be challenging to make it to a lingerie shop like Linea Intima for a proper fitting, especially these days.  So, we are bringing the expert to you.  We reached out to Liliana Mann, founder and owner of Linea Intima, and an authority on all things lingerie.  She shared her tried, tested and true tips for finding the perfect fit when it comes to bras.

 

Positioning is key

When trying on a bra size, it’s important to check the positioning of your breasts first. When your breasts are properly supported they should sit (be positioned) mid-way between your shoulder and elbow.  If your bra sits in this position, it will ensure proper posture and a great fit especially under clothing.

Your cup should not runneth over

After you’ve checked your general fit and positioning, it’s time to check out the cups.  When your bra fits properly, the wires or cups should encompass your breast tissue entirely, from the front of your chest to the under arm.  Your breast tissue should not spill out over the top or sides of the cup of the bra, and the wire should not be digging or cutting into the breast. The wire should also sit comfortably against your skin, below and around the breasts and in between them.  If there is movement or gapping, you likely need to go a size up.

The band should stay put

The back part of the bra, also called the band shouldn’t ride up at the back if your bra fits properly.  It should lie straight across your back, the fabric sitting parallel with the front of the garment.  When your band rides up that can exacerbate poor posture and just be generally uncomfortable.

Start on the loosest hook

When trying on new bras, your goal is to fasten the garment the loosest hook (bras usually have 3 or more rows of hooks connecting the band in the back).  The goal here is to  allow for use of the tighter hooks as the bra ‘gives’ with wear, which also serves to help your bra last longer.

Supportive Straps

The straps should be at the right tension to support comfortably without slipping off your shoulders or digging into them. The straps should also not be set at their tightest, nor should they be digging into your shoulders.  If that’s happening to you, you may need a bigger size, or a bra with wider straps for comfort.  Most importantly, your bra should actually support your breasts without the straps – proper support comes from the band.

 

If you have more questions about proper bra fitting, or are looking to indulge in a new piece of lingerie for yourself, check out Linea Intima online (and message them through their handy chat feature) and reach out to them via their social media links below!

https://lineaintima.ca/

http://www.facebook.com/LineaIntima

http://instagram.com/lineaintimalingerie

 

 

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Nadia Elkharadly

Nadia Elkharadly

Nadia Elkharadly is the Co-Founder and Managing Editor of Addicted Magazine. Her myriad of addictions include music, fashion, travel, technology, boxing and trying to make the world a better place. Nadia is also a feminist, an animal lover, and a neverending dreamer. Keep up with her on social media through @thenadiae.
Nadia Elkharadly