How Millennials Are Changing the Face of Plastic Surgery

Over the last few years, the number of cosmetic procedures has significantly increased. It seems that millenials; those roughly in their mid 20s to mid 30s; have increased the demand for plastic surgery, mainly due to their fixation on self care and growing up with social media. Not only did the latter motivate a high number of millenials to professionally tweak their appearance, but it also made it much less taboo to speak about and get cosmetic procedures. But even though all forms of procedures, from Botox, fillers and microneedling to rhinoplasty and breast augmentation, have almost become a common practice, unlike older generations, millenials aren’t necessarily getting drastic cosmetic surgeries – they’re focused on remaining young and beautiful.

 

A boost in self-confidence

Whether it’s growing up with social media or witnessing the rise of celebrity culture, millenials are much more aware of their body image than older generations, including the areas of their body they are unhappy with. They are constantly exposed to what is perceived as physical perfection, leading them to change the aspects of themselves they deem to be imperfect, in order to achieve their beauty goals. Plastic surgery gives them the opportunity to address their flaws and imperfections, and, as a result, boost their self-esteem and build a more positive body image. For instance, a high number of Americans who are self-conscious about their naturally thin lips augment them with dermal fillers, in order to feel better about their appearance and achieve one of the most desired beauty standards of today.

 

Medical reasons

Plastic surgery is not performed just for cosmetic reasons; a large number of millenials are seeking plastic surgery to address some medical condition. For example, even though nose surgery is one of the most popular procedures in Australia, rhinoplasty in Sydney is most commonly done to resolve conditions such as a deviated septum, and to restore normal breathing function. Similarly, people who suffer from chafing and skin irritation due to excess, loose skin as a result of weight loss often find relief in body contouring procedures, like body lifts and tummy tucks. Not only do these procedures help millenials physically, by allowing them to move more comfortably or breathe more easily, but they also help them on a mental and emotional level, by allowing them to build a more positive body image, which is a very important aspect for this generation.

 

Instant gratification

Most millenials lead very busy lives, which is why they prefer not to take too much time off from their normal daily routines to recover from plastic surgery. Others simply want to see the results of their cosmetic procedures as soon as possible, another common occurrence among this generation in almost all aspects of their lives. Because of this, a high number of millenials often opt for minimally invasive procedures, such as Botox and dermal fillers, as they give them the opportunity to better their appearance with little to no downtime. Another reason why these quick and simple procedures are so popular among millenials might be the fact that this generation is more focused on remaining youthful and looking as natural as possible, prompting them to opt for minimally invasive procedures as early as their 20s and 30s in order to stay looking young.

 

Despite much demonisation in the media, millennials aren’t that much different in their desires than other generations. Procedures such as rhinoplasty, liposuction and breast augmentation are as popular as ever, and will likely continue to be in the future. The only significant difference is the fact that this generation is extremely mindful of results that look and feel natural, which is why the over-the-top, “plastic” look became a thing of the past.

Peter Minkoff
Peter is a lifestyle writer at HighStyleLife magazine, living between Europe and Australia. Follow Peter on Twitter for more tips.
Peter Minkoff
Peter Minkoff

Latest posts by Peter Minkoff (see all)